NPWT: Deeper benefits, broader applications for wound vac.

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Today’s healthcare providers face a dual challenge: drive healthy outcomes for their patients, and drive healthy outcomes for their institutions. As standards rise and budgets shrink, they need to identify tools and strategies to meet both of these challenges at once. In wound care, a pivotal solution is Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT).

Medela NPWT Invia Liberty in use

Clinical effectiveness

The efficacy of NPWT (sometimes referred to as wound vac), has been proven again and again.

The efficacy of NPWT (sometimes referred to as wound vac), has been proven again and again. In a Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Literature Review of Efficacy, Cost Effectiveness, and Impact on Patients' Quality of Life in Chronic Wound Management and Its Implementation in the United Kingdom, by Othman, researchers point to “a substantial body of clinical and economic evidence” that wound vac therapy leads to faster healing, earlier discharges, and fewer readmissions1.

This occurs because wound vac therapy fosters a healthy healing environment. It promotes granulation tissue formation2, reduces edema3, isolates the wound from external infection4, and more. These factors not only support better patient health, they support business goals on the institutional level.

Positive experience

Many studies reinforce how Negative Pressure Wound Therapy not only supports better wound healing, but also provides better experiences for patients and caregivers.

In one survey, Negative Pressure Wound Therapy: improving the patient experience Part 3 of 3, by Upton and Andrews, patients who had NPWT overwhelmingly considered the experience positive5.

In another study6, State-of-the-art treatment of chronic leg ulcers: A randomized controlled trial comparing vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.) with modern wound dressings, by Vuerstaek et al, both groups showed a significant increase in quality of life at the end of therapy and a significant decrease in pain scores at the end of follow-up. But importantly: The patients with chronic leg ulcers who used NPWT healed much faster and the costs related to their care were lower.

In yet another study7, The clinical efficacy and cost effectiveness of the vacuum-assisted closure technique in the management of acute and chronic wounds: a randomized controlled trial, by Braakenburg et al, patients with acute and chronic wounds using NPWT not only healed as fast or faster than those given other types of dressings, but NPWT offered the “important advantage [of] comfort for patients and nursing staff.”

The benefit of comfort was further supported by another study8, Impact of gauze-based NPWT on the patient and nursing experience in the treatment of challenging wounds, by Hurd et al. Researchers found that when gauze dressings were used with NWPT, four out of five dressing changes were both pain-free and described by nurses as “easy,” requiring an average of only about 20 minutes to complete.

These studies reinforce how Negative Pressure Wound Therapy not only supports better wound healing, but also provides better experiences for patients and caregivers.

Diverse applications

The value of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy is not simply in the above benefits, but in its breadth of applications. Beyond those mentioned above, numerous studies have shown the effectiveness of NPWT in treating a host of other types of wounds, including:

  • Dehisced wounds 9
  • Diabetic ulcers 10
  • Pressure ulcers 11
  • Venous insufficiency ulcers 12
  • Traumatic wounds 13
  • Partial thickness burns 14
  • Flaps and grafts 15
  • Closed surgical incisions 16

Medela’s Invia Liberty NPWT System and Invia Motion NPWT System are designed to provide effectiveness, satisfaction, and diverse applications in all wound care settings, including hospitals and home-care environments.

 

 

Find out how the versatility of Medela NPWT Systems can make a meaningful difference in your practice.

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References  1. Diaa Othman. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Literature Review of Efficacy, Cost Effectiveness, and Impact on Patients' Quality of Life in Chronic Wound Management and Its Implementation in the United Kingdom. Plast Surg Int. 2012; 2012: 374398.  2. Moisidis, E., Heath, T., Boorer, C., Ho, K. & Deva, A.K. (2004). A prospective, blinded randomized, controlled clinical trial of topical negative pressure use in skin grafting. Plastic and reconstructive surgery, 114(4), p. 917-922. 3 Chen, S. Z., Li, J., Li, X. Y. & Xu, L. S. (2005). Effects of vacuum-assisted closure on wound microcirculation: an experimental study. Asian journal of surgery, 28(3), p. 211-217. 4. Apelqvist, J., Willy, C., Fagerdahl, A. M., Fraccalvieri, M., Malmsjö, M., Piaggesi, A., ... & Vowden, P. (2017). EWMA Document: Negative Pressure Wound Therapy: Overview, Challenges and Perspectives. Journal of wound care, 26(Sup3), p. 1-154.  5. Upton, D, FBPsS and Andrews, A, BSc, MBPsS. Negative pressure wound therapy: improving the patient experience Part 3 of 3. Journal of Wound Care. https://doi.org/10.12968/jowc.2013.22.12.671. Published Online: April 14, 2014.6. JD Vuerstaek, et al. State-of-the-art treatment of chronic leg ulcers: A randomized controlled trial comparing vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.) with modern wound dressings. J Vasc Surg. 2006 Nov;44(5):1029-37; discussion 1038. Epub 2006 Sep 26.7. Braakenburg A, et al. The clinical efficacy and cost effectiveness of the vacuum-assisted closure technique in the management of acute and chronic wounds: a randomized controlled trial. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2006 Aug;118(2):390-7; discussion 398-400. 8. T. Hurd, et al. Impact of gauze-based NPWT on the patient and nursing experience in the treatment of challenging wounds. Int Wound J. 2010 Dec;7(6):448-55. 9. Ji Young Jang, et al. Application of negative pressure wound therapy in patients with wound dehiscence after abdominal open surgery: a single center experience. J Korean Surg Soc. 2013 Oct; 85(4): 180–184.  10. Liu, et al. Evaluation of negative-pressure wound therapy for patients with diabetic foot ulcers: systematic review and meta-analysis. Ther Clin Risk Manag. 2017; 13: 533–544. 11. Subhas Gupta and Shigeru Ichioka. Optimal use of negative pressure wound therapy in treating pressure ulcers.  Int Wound J 2012; 9 (Suppl. 1):8–16.  12. Dini Valentina, et al. Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Venous Leg Ulcers Before and After Negative Pressure Wound Therapy WOUNDS 2011;23(9):257–266. 13. Daniel Schlatterer, DO; Kurt Hirshorn, MD. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy With Reticulated Open Cell Foam-Adjunctive Treatment in the Management of Traumatic Wounds of the Leg: A Review of the Literature. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma: November-December 2008 - Volume 22 - Issue - p S152-S160.  14. Endre Nagy, Istvan Juhasz. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy — An Effective, Minimally Invasive Therapeutic Modality in Burn Wound Management. ICJM06(05):301-306 · January 2015.  15. S. Lance, et al. Assessing safety of negative-pressure wound therapy over pedicled muscle flaps: A retrospective review of gastrocnemius muscle flap. J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2016 Apr;69(4):519-23.  16. Hyunsuk Suh, MD, et al. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Closed Surgical Wounds With Dead Space Animal Study Using a Swine Model. Ann Plast Surg. 2016 Jun; 76(6): 717–722.